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East of Bloomsbury, Part 5: Regent and Argyle Squares

August 23, 2012 Leave a comment

This is the fifth part of a walking tour following a Pevsner Perambulation in part of Bloomsbury, London; the previous part is here. See the introduction for fuller details; page references are to the Pevsner Buildings of England series volume London 4: North.


Regent Square

Regent Square

We start at Regent Square, entering the gardens in the centre.
The large terrace on the south side (Nos 1-17) is the only one remaining from the original development of the square in around 1829. The last three to the left are set slightly forward and are all that remains of the original houses in Sidmouth St (Nos 51-55).

51-55 Sidmouth St

51-55 Sidmouth St


United Reformed Church, Regent Sq

United Reformed Church, Regent Sq

To the right is the United Reformed Church (originally Presbyterian), which now goes by the trendy name of Lumen. The complex occupies the corner with Wakefield Street. This is a outwardly plain brick modern building of 1965 replacing its bomb-damaged Victorian Gothic predecessor; judging from pictures this was a major wartime loss.


Regent Square, NW corner

Regent Square, NW corner

Turning around to view the opposite (north) side of the square we see postwar redevelopment. To the left and in front of us are former LCC flats of c. 1958, and at the right hand end is the more modern St Peter’s Court. As its name suggests it replaced a redundant church of the same name (originally by the Inwoods of 1820s, with Greek portico similar in style to St Pancras by the same builders and damaged during the war). Notices in the square give an account of some of its history and residents.

Regent Square, NE corner

Regent Square, NE corner


Holy Cross church

Holy Cross church, Cromer St

We leave Regent Square by the NW corner between the LCC flats which brings us through to Cromer Street beside Holy Cross church. This brick towerless building was built in the Early English style in 1887 by Joseph Peacock (see p255) and is hard to photograph in summer! I have never found it open except for services.


Cromer Street, White Heather House

Cromer Street, White Heather House

We turn right on Cromer Street and go along as far as necessary to look at the flats on both sides of the road, which show the development of council housing from the thirties to the fifties. The first few blocks on the left hand (North) side are early St Pancras Borough Council housing dating from either side of the war, White Heather House serving as an example. By contrast the right hand side consists of nine blocks of flats placed at right angles to the street built 1949-51 and refurbished 1996 so they look newer than they are. Four more are on the north side.

Cromer Street, S side

Cromer Street, South side


Tankerton Street

Tankerton Street

We now retrace our steps along Cromer Street to look at some earlier public housing erected by the East End Dwellings Company. The streets on the right are each filled by single developments of flats which although cramped must have been a vast improvement on what they replaced. Tankerton Street, of 1893, is an example (2nd street on the Right).


Tonbridge House, Tonbridge Street

Tonbridge House, Tonbridge Street

We continue to Tonbridge St (opposite Holy Cross church) which we turn into. Tonbridge House on the left hand side is slightly newer (1904) and more spacious, having been built by the LCC. The original sign remains.

Tonbridge House sign

Sign on Tonbridge House, Tonbridge Street


Argyle School

Argyle School, Tonbridge Street

Continuing along Tonbridge Street, Argyle School (see p.263) a little further along on the right hand side, a good example of a Board school slightly hidden from the road by a brick wall.


Argyle Street

Argyle Street

We turn right just before the school and cut through the alleyway into Argyle Street. This is the most complete of a block of a few streets centred around Argyle Square developed in the 1820s, in this case from 1826.

We continue straight on in Argyle Square itself on the left, which has terraces on three sides (many of them now hotels) and a small garden and a basketball court in the centre. This was developed slightly later than the surrounding streets, in the 1840s.

Argyle Square

Argyle Square


Crestfield Street

Crestfield Street

The other streets are more mixed, with original terraces interspersed with newer infill. Crestfield Street and Birkenhead Street both date from 1826 extend the long sides of the square the north (the left as we approach) and St Chad’s Street (from 1827 onwards), forms the continuation of the north side.

Birkenhead Street

Birkenhead Street


St Chad's Street

St Chad’s Street

We continue along St Chad’s Street to the main road at the end, which is Gray’s Inn Road and where the next section of the tour continues.

A further post will continue the tour.

East of Bloomsbury, Part 4

February 23, 2012 Leave a comment

This is the fourth part of a walking tour following a Pevsner Perambulation in part of Bloomsbury, London; the previous part is here. See the introduction for fuller details; page references are to the Pevsner Buildings of England series volume London 4: North.

St George's Gardens

St George's Gardens

This part of the tour starts on the corner of Cartwright Gardens and Hastings Street and covers a section where some of the original early 19the Century development has survived amid later apartment blocks. We turn left into Hastings Street and immediately right into Sandwich Street. In the centre on the left hand side is the Lutheran Church and hostel.

Sandwich Street, Lutheran Hostel

Sandwich Street, Lutheran Hostel

The church is in the basement; if it were not for the cross outside the door it would not be apparent that this is a place of worship.

German Lutheran Church, Sandwich Street

German Lutheran Church, Sandwich Street


Sandwich Street

Sandwich Street

An original 4-storey terrace (nos 1 to 9) is immediately beyond the church on the same side.


Leigh Street

Leigh Street

We continue to the end to Leigh Street. Facing us is another significant terrace (nos 1 to 19), mostly with shops on the ground floor.

We turn left into Leigh Street, where just beyond the corner of Thanet Street and contrasting with the original houses opposite is Medway Court of 1949-55, which is better seen from this side rather than from Judd St where Pevsner mentions it.

Medway Court

Medway Court


Thanet Street

Thanet Street

We now enter Thanet Street, where we find another original terrace (nos 8 to 17), this time (unusually) with only two storeys.


87-103 Judd Street

87-103 Judd Street

At the end we turn right (into Hastings Street again) and then immediately right again into Judd Street. Around here, although not especially noticed by Pevsner, are several large red brick Edwardian mansion blocks. Another long original terrace (nos 87 to 103) is on the right hand side. Number 95 is one of a handful in this area with an original shop front.

95 Judd St

95 Judd St


Medical Centre, Hunter Street

Medical Centre, Hunter Street

We continue on past Medway House as Judd Street becomes Hunter Street, heading back towards the Brunswick Centre. On the corner with Handel Street is the Health Centre. This is best viewed from the steps of the Brunswick Centre, as are the late Georgian houses at 3-4 Hunter Street on the same side.

3-4 Hunter Street

3-4 Hunter Street


Handel Street

Handel Street

We cross over into Handel Street where nos 4-7 are on the right hand side, sandwiched between Edwardian mansion blocks.


A short deviation now from the tour as given to take in St George’s Gardens (see p. 263), which we enter through the gateway at the end of Handel Street.

St George's Gardens

St George's Gardens

This is one of several similar small gardens in this part of London, laid out in what were originally overflow cemeteries for neighbouring parish churches, an early attempt to solve the problem of lack of space inside overcrowded churchyards. A line of stone slabs along the centre marks the boundary between the former burial grounds for the parishes of St George, Bloomsbury and St George the Martyr, Holborn. At the time it was created (1713) it lay outside the built-up area. Although unpopular at first, it soon filled up and eventually became gardens in 1882. The gardens are landscaped around the large remaining 18th Century chest tombs and obelisk.

St George's Gardens Lodge and Chapel

St George's Gardens Lodge and Chapel

Just on the right inside the gate as we enter are the early 19th Century former mortuary chapel and the Lodge beside it.

Immediately in front of us as we enter is the statue of Euterpe removed from the Apollo Inn, Tottenham Court Road when it was demolished in 1961.

Euterpe, St George's Gardens

Euterpe

The earliest notable memorial is to Robert Nelson of 1715, who was one of the promoters of the cemetery and who by being buried here himself made it more acceptable. It is easily identified by the urn on top, on the right hand side.

Nelson Memorial

Robert Nelson Memorial

We pass out through the exit at the far left hand corner into Regent Square, where the tour continues.

East of Bloomsbury Part 3: Around Cartwright Gardens

December 1, 2011 2 comments

This is the third part of a walking tour following a Pevsner Perambulation in part of Bloomsbury, London; the previous part is here. See the introduction for fuller details; page references are to the Pevsner Buildings of England series volume London 4: North.

We start at the south end of Cartwright Gardens, which forms a crescent on the left with gardens in the centre, but first we look at right hand (straight) side, which is filled by three uninspiring University of London Halls of Residence (see pp. 281), collectively known as the Garden Halls.

Commonwealth Hall

Commonwealth Hall, Cartwright Gardens, London WC1

Commonwealth Hall of 1960-3 (planned 1947) is the first block on the right on the corner of Leigh St.

Hughes Parry Hall

Hughes Parry Hall, Cartwright Gardens

Hughes Parry Hall of 1967-9 is furthest on the corner of Sandwich Street. Between the two and not noticed by Pevsner is Canterbury Hall, of 1937 according to its website, which is no less worthy of notice than it neighbours and has some interesting period detail at least around the entrance.

Canterbury Hall

Canterbury Hall, Cartwright Gardens


John Cartwright statue

John Cartwright statue

Opposite in centre of the east (straight) side is a statue of John Cartwright, after whom the Crescent is named. The gardens are dominated by tennis courts and are not normally open.


The main crescent is formed of two sets of substantial original (c1820) terraces. In Trollope‘s day, this was known as Burton Crescent and he used it as the setting for the boarding house where Johnny Eames lodged while in London, in his Barset Chronicle The Small House at Allington. The boarding houses of Trollope’s day have now become hotels in the south quadrant, and the bulk of the north quadrant, which was refurbished during 2008, looks like it is University accommodation.

Cartwright Gardens, northern quadrant

Cartwright Gardens, northern quadrant


4-7 Burton Place

4-7 Burton Place

In the centre between the two parts of the crescent is Burton Place, which we enter. Nos 4-7 are on the right (North side) and were built as four houses disguised as one.


Burton Street, rear of BMA building

Burton Street, rear of BMA building

Burton Place leads into Burton Street. Immediately in front and stretching northwards is the rear of British Medical Association building (1911-25, see p 265-6) of which the prominent part is Lutyens’s’ great hall. The rest is more recent and plainer.

Original terraces are to the left, which is a cul-de-sac, so there is no need to go in that direction.

Burton Street, London WC1

Burton Street


We turn right along Burton Street along the length of the BMA building, then left at the end. Almost immediately in front are Woburn Walk and Duke’s Road.

Woburn Walk

Woburn Walk


Woburn Walk is to the left with the original (1822) bay-fronted shops on both sides, Duke’s Road is to the right with similar buildings on one side only (the one facing us). They form quite a picturesque group and can occasionally be seen as a backdrop in period TV dramas or films.

Duke's Rd

Duke's Rd


Dukes's Rd, The Place

Duke's Rd, The Place

Opposite in Duke’s Road is the former Drill Hall (“The Place”) of 1888-9. This is now used by a Dance School, more modern buildings stretching out of sight behind it. It is used as a café and retains its original terracotta embellishments revealing its original identity for the Middlesex (Artists’) Rifle Volunteers.

Duke's Rd, The Place, terracotta

Terracotta decoration on The Place, Dukes's Rd


Flaxman Terrace, lodge

Flaxman Terrace, lodge

We retrace our steps back to Flaxman Terrace. The right hand side consists of an early (1907-8) public housing development by St Pancras Borough Council. Immediately on the corner is the caretaker’s lodge, and behind it on the right are the flats of 1908. Note the iron railings in front which include the St Pancras coat of arms.

Flaxman Terrace

Flaxman Terrace


Hamilton House

Hamilton House, Mabledon Place

We continue to the end of Flaxman Terrace to Mabledon Place. The Headquarters of the National Union of Teachers, Hamilton House occupies the block opposite and to the right, between Bidborough Street and Hastings Street. This is one of many current or former Trade Union Headquarters buildings, which have congregated up and down the Euston Road because of the good rail links to the rest of the country.

Hamilton House, doorway

Hamilton House, doorway

At the right hand corner of Hamilton House we find ourselves at the North end of Cartwright Gardens once again and we turn left into Hastings Street where the next section of the tour continues.

East of Bloomsbury Part 2: Tavistock Place

October 17, 2011 1 comment

This is the second part of a walking tour following a Pevsner Perambulation in part of Bloomsbury, London; the first part is here. See the introduction for fuller details; page references are to the Pevsner Buildings of England series volume London 4: North.

Tavistock Place N side

Tavistock Place North side looking West

We start in Herbrand Street, where we find the striking white art deco building now used as offices by the marketing firm McCann Erickson. I like the curve of the ramp between floors (betraying its original use as a garage for Daimler) and there are some other nice details surrounding windows and doorways.

McCann Erickson office, former garage

Herbrand St, McCann Erickson office


We retrace our steps and cross back over Coram St to the northern continuation of Herbrand St where there are two contrasting sets of public housing dating from a century ago, one on either side.

Herbrand St former LCC flats

Herbrand St former LCC flats

On the left (west) side is a former London County Council (LCC) development of three blocks of flats. They are rather plain red brick blocks of five storeys without any embellishment. It looks as if they may have been built with balconies that were later filled in.


Opposite is the more substantial Peabody estate, built around a courtyard.

Peabody Estate, Herbrand St

Peabody Estate, Herbrand St

Its striped brick appearance is archetypal of Peabody housing of this period. It didn’t take much lunchtime wandering around in central London before I found I could correctly identify Peabody flats from a distance. It is interesting to note, a hundred years later, that (as here) the Peabody flats often look both more solid and better maintained than their former LCC contemporaries.


We continue to the end of the road, turn right into Tavistock Place and turn right again into Kenton St. Around here, there are quite a few red brick Edwardian mansion blocks, the one Pevsner has picked out (occupying most of the right hand side) fits the description, having five storeys, but is quite plain and unexceptional even compared to some of the other blocks in neighbouring streets.

Aberdeen House, Kenton St

Aberdeen House

Aberdeen House is an example – it has clearly been truncated (possibly by wartime bombing) to make room for the Brunswick Centre.

I think the converted workshop next door to it (not mentioned, possibly refurbished since 1998) is of more interest, retaining its original sign and hoist, and is typical of the type of the small workshops that once were common in this area.

Kenton Street

Kenton Street old workshop


We retrace our steps and return to Tavistock Place and turn left to the far (Woburn Place) end. Tavistock Place is quite busy, used especially by taxis cutting through between Tottenham Court Road and Gray’s Inn Road.

Mary Ward House, Tavistock Place

Mary Ward House, Tavistock Place


Mary Ward House is the rather odd-looking hall on the right hand side at the far end. It is not mentioned in the perambulation (but see p.267-8) as is 9 Tavistock Place next to it, partly hidden behind a high brick wall.


2-14 Tavistock Place

2-14 Tavistock Place


Opposite are 2-14 Tavistock Place, modern facsimiles in the style of the original houses in the vicinity, including arched lights above the doors and sash windows. The sharp and new brickwork (in yellow brick rather than red) gives it away as being more than just an expensive restoration.


18-46 Tavistock Place

18-46 Tavistock Place


Continuing eastwards, immediately beyond Herbrand St, 18-48 Tavistock Place are original and provide a nice contrast, being very similar apart from the stuccoed ground floors.

We continue along Tavistock Place as far as Marchmont St and turn left into Cartwright Gardens where the next section of the tour continues.

Link updated 01/12/2011.

East of Bloomsbury, Part 1: Around Brunswick Square

July 26, 2011 2 comments

This is the first part of a walking tour following a Pevsner Perambulation in part of Bloomsbury, London. See the introduction for fuller details; page references are to the Pevsner Buildings of England series volume London 4: North.

The tour starts at Russell Square Underground station. If arriving by train, come out of the exit and turn right into Bernard Street. Diagonally opposite a bit further along looms the Brunswick Centre, of which more in a moment. First, we cross over the road to look at the station itself, not noticed by Pevsner, dating from 1906 with red glazed brick typical of Underground stations of this period.

Russell Square Underground Station

Russell Square Underground Station


12-28 Bernard St, London WC1

12-28 Bernard St, London WC1

12-28 Bernard Street are immediately beside the station, a neat brick terrace of 1802 from the original development of this area. These are typical of the streets round about here; clearly they are now all owned by the same organisation, presumably the University, and it looks as if they have all been restored together at some point. Certainly the doorways and windows are all nicely scrubbed.


 

International Hall, Brunswick Square

International Hall, Brunswick Square

Continuing along Bernard St which becomes the southern side of Brunswick Square, we find International Hall, a University Hall of Residence (see p281), a large uninteresting slab built between 1958 and 1967 which more or less fills that side of the square.


 

Foundling Hospital Museum

Foundling Hospital Museum, Brunswick Square

Brunswick Square isn’t really a square, in the usual urban sense, as the east side is missing. I assume there never have been buildings on this side, as it was where the Foundling Hospital previously stood, and is now Coram’s Field. The buildings now surrounding the gardens in its centre are now so unalike that it has lost any sense of unity. We walk through the gardens to the opposite (north) side. In the corner is the Foundling Hospital Museum, a neat enough building of 1937 but which is really picked out for the survival within of some furnishings from the original Hospital. I haven’t been inside. In front of it stands a statue of the founder, Thomas Coram.

Thomas Coram statue

Statue of Thomas Coram, Brunswick Square


School of Pharmacy

School of Pharmacy, Brunswick Square

Immediately next to the Foundling Museum filling the rest of the north side of the square is the large bulk of the School of Pharmacy (see p.280), “grimly symmetrical” according to Pevsner. Personally, I didn’t find it the most grim building on the tour.


Brunswick Centre from Brunswick Square

Having ignored it until now, it is time to address the Brunswick Centre which dominates the west side of the square. This is a huge concrete fortress built between 1968-72, and quite why anybody thought this would enhance the area visually I have no idea. Pevsner has a lot to say about this building, but what he fails to say is that it is an ugly concrete lump. A refurbishment programme started in 1998 after Pevsner was published and seems to have softened it a little. It presents its most brutal face to the square, including the main entrance, which stands out prominently, if starkly.


Brunswick Centre piazza

Brunswick Centre piazza

We now go through the entrance in the centre (by the cinema entrance) to the central piazza, which is rather more humane, being full of shops at the (raised) ground level with flats above and is where the cascade design at higher levels can be best appreciated. The Brunswick Centre’s own website gives additional views (including some aerial ones) and background information.

Marchmont St Brunswick Centre

Brunswick Centre, Marchmont Street side

Leaving via the NW corner (by Waitrose) into gives us a chance to look at the side adjoining Marchmont St. This face gives another good view of the stepped design of the upper levels and the greenhouse-style windows which soften the overall harshness of the concrete.


Marchmont Street

Marchmont Street

Immediately opposite the exit from the Brunswick Centre is a terrace on the west side of Marchmont St, stretching northwards. This is part of the original development of the early 1800s and provides a contrast to what we have seen; Pevsner invites us to “ponder” on it.

The next section of the tour continues in Herbrand St, which is reached via Coram St, opposite the exit from the Brunswick Centre.

(Link updated 18/10/2011)

East of Bloomsbury: Brunswick Square to Gray’s Inn Road

July 25, 2011 4 comments

This is the first of a series of posts that will gradually follow describing a walking tour following a Pevsner Perambulation in part of Bloomsbury, London

Cartwright Gardens

Cartwright Gardens, London WC1

A feature of Pevsner’s Buildings of England series are the ‘perambulations’ – the term must have been archaic even in the 1950s when Pevsner started writing, nevertheless subsequent editors have retained it. Following them can be a good way to get to know a place, and during lunchtimes I have followed the ones within reach of my office. Of these, this one (Holborn 5, in the London North volume) has the greatest variety, containing a mixture of the original early 19th Century private residential development, institutions and later 20th Century public housing.  

This is a part of London that will be familiar to many people visiting for business or leisure, being near to Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross stations and many of the main University of London sites in Bloomsbury. That said, the area covered contains no prominent landmarks, and will probably not be one that most people, even those who regularly pass by, know well.  

To me, it is its very ordinariness that makes it interesting. I am not an architectural historian; my interest is as a sometime geographer, to see how this area has come to be the way it is today and how its past still affects the present. Following Pevsner’s architectural tour is a way to do that.  

Despite Pevsner’s designation, most of this area was originally in the parish (and later Borough) of St Pancras, rather than Holborn, both eventually being absorbed into the London Borough of Camden. It covers the area between Woburn Place in the west and King’s Cross Road in the east, and from Euston Road to the north and Guilford Street to the south.  

Parish markers in Lamb's Conduit St, London WC1

Parish Markers in Lamb's Conduit St, London WC1


It traverses most of the ground within these limits, sometimes in following it we retrace our steps, other times the route loops around and we find ourselves opposite where we were a few minutes before. The distances are quite short, and sometimes what reads like a complicated set of directions is more or less “just over there”.  

Brunswick Centre sign

Brunswick Centre sign

This is quite an interesting area to explore, as it was first developed from just before 1800 and was fully built up by about 1840. Although some of it, especially in the southern part, was initially upmarket, by the end of the 19th century much of it had become filled by sub-standard and overcrowded working class housing. Slum clearances and wartime bomb damage were replaced by some large public housing developments through most of the 20th century. More recently, commercial uses have encroached on formerly residential properties. Despite the dramatic changes in London during the last decade or so, nearly all the buildings identified on the tour when the book was published in 1998 remain standing, and few, if any, obviously significant new ones have been built since then.  

When I quote Pevsner, most of the time of course I really mean the editor of this particular edition, Bridget Cherry. I expect in practice few of the Pevsner’s original comments from the 1950s have survived through to the 1998 version, which has been much expanded on the original, and those that do are often quoted directly.  

Most of the photos were taken during lunchtimes in the spring/summer months of 2008 to 2010, when the weather was fair (which wasn’t often). Some photos are better than others, as light conditions at lunchtime varied and were not always ideal for photographing north-facing buildings, which in a handful of cases simply could not be photographed. As anyone can tell I am not a professional photographer and just have a fairly simple camera. On the whole I haven’t made a point of going back to get a better photograph, so if the best one I’ve got isn’t quite straight or lacks contrast, I hope it is still good enough to illustrate the point. There are also many other photos available on the Geograph site.
  
More information


Tonbridge St, WC1 view to St Pancras clock tower

Tonbridge St, WC1 view to St Pancras clock tower

The perambulation is found on pp328-333 of London: North, I have also done my best to identify all buildings in other sections (i.e. public buildings) that are in the same area but are not necessarily mentioned in the text.  

This area falls mostly within Ordnance Survey Grid Square TQ3082.  

An older view of most of this area is within this section of Greenwood’s map of 1827.  

Also see the Finsbury West map from 1885.  

Finally, much of the area can be followed by Google’s street view, although there are some gaps. At the time of writing it looks like most of Google’s pictures date from summer 2008.

The tour starts at Russell Square Underground station.

Reference

Bridget Cherry and Nicolaus Pevsner (1998), London 4: North (Buildings of England), Yale University Press edition 2002.

The 1930’s semi – the true image of London

June 28, 2011 Leave a comment

Think of a building to symbolise London and you are likely straight away to think of the Houses of Parliament, the Tower of London or St Paul’s Cathedral. Thinking a bit more about what London looks like, you might think of the modern offices of the City, or the busy shopping streets in the West End.

Films often show Londoners as living in stucco-clad Victorian terraces in the smartest districts of Kensington or Chelsea, or maybe brick Victorian villas in almost as fashionable North London areas like Hampstead or Islington. More gritty films and TV dramas tend to focus on run-down inner city council estates in places like Bermondsey or Hackney.

All these images portray different faces of London to the visitor, but the most typical London environment of all is rarely noticed – interwar suburbia – with its ubiquitous 1930’s semi.

They are common all over England, especially the south east; suburban London consists of swathes of nearly identical streets of nearly identical houses. Anywhere in outer London, the majority of the built up area consists of houses like this; Enfield, Ruislip, Kingston, Bromley, Romford.

Usually with three bedrooms (though often the third is little more than a box room), sometimes a little larger or smaller, or grander or plainer, they are always built in the same slightly oddly proportioned style – whether mock-Tudor, plastered, pebbledashed or plain brick. The properties advertised for sale in any outer London estate agent will give a full range of examples; here is a house in Hornchurch which, unusually, retains its original windows.

Semi

Interwar London semi-detached house

Private developers enabled the massive growth of the 1930s as Londoners moved out in their droves in search of the country, which was promptly built up as soon as they got there. This rapid expansion was only halted by the outbreak of war which gave a pause for long enough for the Green Belt Act to be passed, so the edge of London today remains more or less where it had reached in 1939. For example, the population of Chislehurst and Sidcup Urban District grew from 20,493 to 83,850 between 1931 and 1951 – almost all of this would have been before 1939.

I grew up in a house like this, as did most of my friends at school; and in a quite different part of London, so did my wife. For me, this is the true image of London.

More

The Rise of the Semi by James Brennan, A short article on the design of a typical semi-detached house.

Another article, The Rise of the Semi-detached House looking at the Kent town of Dartford, officially just outside Greater London now but part of its interwar suburban sprawl.

An audio/slideshow, Semi-detached London – 1930s Suburbia putting 1930’s suburbia in its social context. The site also has a wide selection of images of London on this and other subjects.

1930's suburbia, Romford

1930's suburbia, Romford

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