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East of Bloomsbury, Part 4

February 23, 2012 Leave a comment

This is the fourth part of a walking tour following a Pevsner Perambulation in part of Bloomsbury, London; the previous part is here. See the introduction for fuller details; page references are to the Pevsner Buildings of England series volume London 4: North.

St George's Gardens

St George's Gardens

This part of the tour starts on the corner of Cartwright Gardens and Hastings Street and covers a section where some of the original early 19the Century development has survived amid later apartment blocks. We turn left into Hastings Street and immediately right into Sandwich Street. In the centre on the left hand side is the Lutheran Church and hostel.

Sandwich Street, Lutheran Hostel

Sandwich Street, Lutheran Hostel

The church is in the basement; if it were not for the cross outside the door it would not be apparent that this is a place of worship.

German Lutheran Church, Sandwich Street

German Lutheran Church, Sandwich Street


Sandwich Street

Sandwich Street

An original 4-storey terrace (nos 1 to 9) is immediately beyond the church on the same side.


Leigh Street

Leigh Street

We continue to the end to Leigh Street. Facing us is another significant terrace (nos 1 to 19), mostly with shops on the ground floor.

We turn left into Leigh Street, where just beyond the corner of Thanet Street and contrasting with the original houses opposite is Medway Court of 1949-55, which is better seen from this side rather than from Judd St where Pevsner mentions it.

Medway Court

Medway Court


Thanet Street

Thanet Street

We now enter Thanet Street, where we find another original terrace (nos 8 to 17), this time (unusually) with only two storeys.


87-103 Judd Street

87-103 Judd Street

At the end we turn right (into Hastings Street again) and then immediately right again into Judd Street. Around here, although not especially noticed by Pevsner, are several large red brick Edwardian mansion blocks. Another long original terrace (nos 87 to 103) is on the right hand side. Number 95 is one of a handful in this area with an original shop front.

95 Judd St

95 Judd St


Medical Centre, Hunter Street

Medical Centre, Hunter Street

We continue on past Medway House as Judd Street becomes Hunter Street, heading back towards the Brunswick Centre. On the corner with Handel Street is the Health Centre. This is best viewed from the steps of the Brunswick Centre, as are the late Georgian houses at 3-4 Hunter Street on the same side.

3-4 Hunter Street

3-4 Hunter Street


Handel Street

Handel Street

We cross over into Handel Street where nos 4-7 are on the right hand side, sandwiched between Edwardian mansion blocks.


A short deviation now from the tour as given to take in St George’s Gardens (see p. 263), which we enter through the gateway at the end of Handel Street.

St George's Gardens

St George's Gardens

This is one of several similar small gardens in this part of London, laid out in what were originally overflow cemeteries for neighbouring parish churches, an early attempt to solve the problem of lack of space inside overcrowded churchyards. A line of stone slabs along the centre marks the boundary between the former burial grounds for the parishes of St George, Bloomsbury and St George the Martyr, Holborn. At the time it was created (1713) it lay outside the built-up area. Although unpopular at first, it soon filled up and eventually became gardens in 1882. The gardens are landscaped around the large remaining 18th Century chest tombs and obelisk.

St George's Gardens Lodge and Chapel

St George's Gardens Lodge and Chapel

Just on the right inside the gate as we enter are the early 19th Century former mortuary chapel and the Lodge beside it.

Immediately in front of us as we enter is the statue of Euterpe removed from the Apollo Inn, Tottenham Court Road when it was demolished in 1961.

Euterpe, St George's Gardens

Euterpe

The earliest notable memorial is to Robert Nelson of 1715, who was one of the promoters of the cemetery and who by being buried here himself made it more acceptable. It is easily identified by the urn on top, on the right hand side.

Nelson Memorial

Robert Nelson Memorial

We pass out through the exit at the far left hand corner into Regent Square, where the tour continues.